Streaming Means You’ll Never Own Your Favorite Movies or Music. Here’s Why That Matters

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Streaming Means You'll Never Own Your Favorite Movies or Music. Here's Why That Matters

Going to a friend’s house for movie evenings and perusing their physical collections was always fun when I was a kid. DVDs of my favourite movies, like Shrek and Lilo & Stitch, were some of the most treasured presents I ever received as a child (still absolute classics, in my opinion). Knowing that I now had a physical copy of the movie I saw in cinemas and adored, and that I could watch it whenever I wanted, was amazing. It was standing still.

The media landscape has significantly changed since yesterday. The majority of us use streaming services like Netflix, Hulu, or Disney Plus to view movies and TV episodes. Because we spend so much money on all these streaming services and assume we can find anything we want to watch there, we don’t tend to purchase DVDs, Blu-rays, or even digital versions of movies as frequently as we formerly did.

But if there’s one thing about the world of streaming that never changes, it’s that.

You might open a Netflix account to watch a show that’s been getting a lot of buzz, only to learn that it’s suddenly available only on Peacock. In a highly competitive market, streaming services constantly change the content they offer. You can’t always rely on your favourite media to be available on the platforms you subscribe to, unlike the days when we all had actual copies of movies, TV series, and music.

Streaming Means You’ll Never Own Your Favorite Movies or Music

Sophia Fox-Sowell was interviewed by techjazzup’s Joan Solsman, who said, “You have a huge library at your fingertips, but you don’t have a lot of control over what goes in and out of that library. “Things and privileges may abruptly vanish from existence at times. But the best part is that you have far greater access to other things without having to covertly pay for everything you want to watch or listen to.”

Although it’s fantastic to not have to pay for every new record that comes out, I do miss the times when I had to go into Target to purchase physical CDs and enjoy browsing through the booklets that came with them. Of course, you can still do this, but if you already pay for music subscription services like Spotify, Apple Music, or YouTube Music, it seems less reasonable. They are simply so much more practical. In fact, these days I’d have a hard time even finding a place to play a CD. (Erin Carson, a coworker, might disagree with me on this.

Although it’s fantastic to not have to pay for every new record that comes out, I do miss the times when I had to go into Target to purchase physical CDs and enjoy browsing through the booklets that came with them. Of course, you can still do this, but it seems less feasible if you’re already But there are a lot of benefits to having tangible copies of your favourite material.

Not only can a platform’s options change, but even after a movie, TV show, or song has been released, it may still be modified or changed. You won’t be able to return to the original version of something if you don’t have a tangible copy of it. (For instance, the makers of Game of Thrones went back and cut out a Starbucks cup that got into a shot by accident. On any of HBO’s platforms, that version won’t ever be seen again.)